Pic ‘o the week – yellownose gobies & brain coral

A healthy coral reef can be one of the most colorful places on earth: here, a pair of curious yellownose gobies gaze out from their refuge of richly textured bolder brain coral.

Todd Mintz snapped this stunning photo in of yellownose gobies, Elacatinus randalli, and bolder brain coral in Bonaire, Dutch Caribbean.

This pic won First Place, Macro in the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science’s annual amateur underwater photography contest. Check out the other winners here – and get your underwater photog vibe on — there’s plenty of time to grab some award-winning ocean pics for next year.

Spotlight: Monk Seals, ‘living fossils’ of the sea

They’re the oldest species of seals on the planet, believed to have been swimming Earth’s waters for millions of years. And today they’re the most endangered marine mammals in the world.

Hawaiian monk seal. Photo courtesy Kaua’i Monk Seal Watch Program.

Hawai’i’s monk seals (Monachus schauinslandi) are one of two mammal species endemic to the islands (the other is the Hoary Bat). Long ago, Hawaiians named these creatures Ilio-holo-i-ka-uaua –  or “dog that runs in the sea.”

Mediterranean monk seals (Monachus monachus) were said in Greek mythology to be protected by Apollo and Poseidon, and were described by Aristotle and other Greek writers. A monk seal face was etched onto coins dating from the 6th century BC, found in the ancient city of Ionia, on the Aegean Sea.

The third recently known monk seal population, the Caribbean monk seal (Monachus tropicalis), has been declared extinct; the last one was sighted in 1952.

Mediterranean monk seal in cave. Photo by Giovanni Dall’Orto; via WikiCommons

Today, the Mediterranean monk seal population is precariously below 500 individuals and believed to be declining. They’re now found predominantly in caves and areas isolated from humans – not the open beaches where scientists believe they traditionally spent their time.

Hawaiian monk seals number less than 1,200 individuals, and are also believed to be declining in alarming numbers. A 2009 scientific study stated that Hawaiian monk seals face a genetic bottleneck, with the lowest genetic diversity of any mammal species ever studied.

Both populations are critically endangered, and face multiple threats – encroaching human populations, entanglement in marine debris and fishing gear, infectious disease and more. They also have a relatively slow reproductive rate compared to other seals.

Funding for their protection in both Hawai’i and Greece is not certain, particularly in these rough economic times.

Learn about these remarkable creatures here (Hawaiian monk seal), here (Mediterranean monk seal)here (the tragic Caribbean monk seal), and here. Keep up on latest monk seal news here.

And perhaps  figure out what you can do to help them make it through another million years on this planet.

Some ideas are here and  here for helping the Hawaiian clan; you can support efforts in the Mediterranean by adopting a monk seal here. (Use GoogleTranslate on this page)

Update 16 Feb. 2012: TV3 out of NZ has a good read on a male monk seal being relocated to Waikiki Aquarium because of aggressive behavior toward his brethren. 

Update, 27 Jan. 2012: this AP article is a good read – illustrating how NOAA’s efforts have been helping the critically endangered monk seal population in Hawai’i.

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cruises and oceans – high impact

Caribbean countries showed their sea some love this week by banning the dumping of all garbage at sea. As one UN consultant working on the pact said, “It’s a big deal.” And it’s been a long time coming – the ban was established,  for all intents and purposes, in 1993. But it’s taken until 2010 for Caribbean countries to get alternative disposal methods in place.

The effect of the ban will depend on enforcement by each country, so let’s keep a close eye on them.

Out in the Pacific Northwest, the nonprofit reporting group InvestigateWest is planning to take a hard look at the impacts of cruise ships on local ecologies. Some cruise lines are trying to be eco-responsible, and some might be just greenwashing. It’s important to track their practices closely – the amount of waste each ship produces is staggering, according to InvestigateWest:

“More than 230 cruise ships operate around the world, generating millions of gallons of waste water every day.  A typical cruise ship with 3,000 passengers and crew members generates more than 200,000 gallons of human sewage, one million gallons of waste water, eight tons of garbage and more than 25,000 gallons of oily bilge water each week.”

Photo courtesy NYDiscovery